Letters

Better Bottles

May 30, 2018

To the Editor:

If you walk into any high school classroom this year, you will see water bottles perched in the corner of each and every desk. Within the last decade or so, keeping water throughout the day has become the new norm. Everyone has water bottles today, something that wouldn’t be as common 30 years ago. The old Poland Springs bottles aren’t enough anymore. This generation is obsessed with reusable water bottles, and their benefits are definitely worth their price in the long run.

Using reusable water bottles has so many great benefits. Fifty billion water bottles are used annually in the U.S., costing 17 million barrels of crude oil, according to the Tree Tribe policy. By using a reusable water bottle, a person can help save the environment, because even a small act such as this would have a great benefit. Additionally, buying cases of plastic water bottles can add up over time, with dollars a year spent on water, something a majority of people already have easy access to at home.

Plastic water bottles aren’t just bad for the planet, however; they are bad for your blood as well. Most people may not know that plastic water bottles gradually leak a chemical called bisphenol-A (BPA) into the liquids that are stored in the bottle. Technically, plastic water bottles are slowly poisoning us. Buying stainless steel water bottles may be a bit expensive but are so much more beneficial in the long run. They are healthier for the planet and for our bodies.

These days, metal water bottles can be found anywhere from Swell brands to Yeti. Though people may believe they are a bit pricey, ranging anywhere from $15 to $50, they serve many purposes. These metal reusable bottles can keep drinks icy cold or piping hot for extremely long amounts of time. They appear in all different patterns and styles and are almost indestructible.

Be the generation that makes clean water easier to access and make the switch to reusable water bottles. You will find that it was worth every penny spent.

Marcella Fiorica

Manahawkin

The writer is a Southern Regional High School student.

 

 

 

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